MacTech Quarterly

Mission Statement

The journal designed for people who program and develop for the Apple Macintosh.

You hold in your hands what is destined to be a legendary publication for an already legendary computer. In these wee, early hours of the computer revolution, just a scant half decade after the introduction of Apple’s flagship computer, the world needs a magazine that focuses on the needs of the Mac developer community with the intensity, vision, and utility of no other existing publication.

Nuts-and-bolts programming solutions and tutorials. In depth looks at future technologies and present opportunities. An emphasis on both object-oriented and procedural languages, on database programming and spreadsheet macros, on HyperTalking and multimedia applications. Feature articles, tutorials, reviews, and commentary by some of the most important, creative, and eloquent programmers in the Macintosh universe.

MacTech Quarterly will be preeminently useful and intellectually provocative. An essential desktop reference for today’s serious programmers, as well as a tool that will help pave your way to the future of programming.

MacTech Quarterly.

Blurb from the initial issue (Spring 1989) of MacTech Quarterly

History of MacTech Quarterly

Only five (5) issues of the A.P.P.L.E. / TechAlliance produced magazine were ever published.  The MacTech Quarterly was the result of ending production of Mac A.P.P.L.E. / Mac Horizons magazine.  We have all five issues in data format but only two of the issues in physical printed format.  We are still looking for the remaining issues.

With Dr. David A. Lingwood at the helm of the magazine as the Publisher / Editorial Directory and Andrew Himes as the Editor, the MacTech Quarterly was one of the first magazines to not only attempt to provide the Macintosh users with programming and developer information but also one of the first to attempt to bridge the lack of female programmers in the industry at the time. Although controversial for 1989, today the magazine is regarded as the first to bridge this chasm in the industry.

MacTech Quarterly was administered by the A.P.P.L.E. / Tech Alliance User Group’s offices and directors. These included: Robert Clardy (President), Bob Huelsdonk (Vice-President), Don Williams (treasurer), Michael D. Branham (secretary), Jack Connick (director), Merle H. Davis (director), Dave DeGroot (director), Anthony Fortini (Director).

The Administration of the MacTech Quarterly was handled by Wayne Cunningham (CEO), Linda Crag (assistant GM), Dr. David A. Lingwood (Communications manager), Dr. Charles Tillman (member services manager) and Jim Clayton (Operations manager). Jerry Simper also served as CFO at one point in the life of the magazine. Eventually, Merle Davis took over for Wayne as the acting CEO and Gunter Hirt (accounting), Larry Neibauer (Network Admin), Mike Csendes (Operations, Shipping), Rich Grass (Customer Service) and Paul Stout (BBS Sysop) joined Merle in the administration of the magazine during the later issues.

Other Staff on the magazine included: Janine L. West (associate editor), Curtis Snow (associate editor), Karla Landsverk (editorial assistant) and Dora McClurkin (art director), Mary Hubert (art director), Jude Bevis (advertising coordinator), Shirley Reinhardt (marketing), Larry Neibauer (technical adviser), Michael and Lisa Storrie-Lombardi (Technical Editors), Bruce Taylor (Circulation Manager), and Janice Bultmann (Assistant Editor).

Artwork seen on the covers and in the magazines were contributed by the following artists: Les Campbell,John Laney, Pamela Hobbs, Michael Gilmore, Robert Williamson, and Sam Day.

The magazine was shut down when the entire staff was let go in 1990 to curtail an excessive use of funds that was occurring at the time. The final issue of both MacTech Quarterly and the flagship magazine Call-A.P.P.L.E. were given a Winter 1990 date and the release was overseen by Don Williams and Kathryn Hallgrimson. Although the Winter 1990 issue of MacTech Quarterly says Volume 1 Number 4, it is actually Volume 2 Number 2. This mistake was due to the original files being wrong when they went to print.

Current State of the Magazine

The original floppies with the magazine data on them were preserved by Norman Dodge and Bill Martens from 1994 until 2019. Bill succeeded in 2019 in recovering all of the internal floppy disks using the Applesauce Floppy Disk Controller by John Morris. Since then, Brian Wiser has managed to recover and convert 99% of the data from the original files into modern formats. We now are putting this data online in an effort to not only preserve the data for future hobbyists but are also making the data available to all readers.  

To date, the entire first issue of the MacTech Quarterly is available in article format. The other four issues have had their data converted and are now in the process of being added to the A.P.P.L.E. website. Stay tuned for more!

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Other Magazine Staff Information 1989-1990

The Editorial Board for the MacTech Quarterly included the following people:

Frank Alviani, Leonard Rosenthal, Brita Meng, Timlynn Babitsky, Jim Salmons, Raines Cohen, Ric Ford, Stan Krute, Anna O’Connell, Howard Katz, Paul Snidely, Richard Guerra, Jr. Doug Houseman, Bill Woodruff

Contributing authors to the MacTech Quarterly included:

Dan Allen, Frank Alviani, Timlynn Babitsky, Eric Bowman, Raines Cohen, Craig Davidson, Elon Gasper, Ricardo Guerra, Jr., Ted Johnson, Howard Katz, Scott Knaster, Randy Leonard, Richard Loggins, Chuck Lukaszewski, Anna O’Connell, Mick O’Neill, Craig Ragland, Leonard Rosenthal, Jim Salmons, Dan Shafer, Michael & Lisa Storrie-Lombardie, Fred Terry, Rick Thomas, Doug Houseman, Paul Goodman, Rae Monitor, John R. Powers, Malcolm Teas, Peter & Allen Baum, Bill Woodruff, Steve Witten, Allen Holub, Jason Winshell, Frank Giraffe, Tony Myles, Chris Van Hamersveld, Jim Flanagan, Joe Pillera, Richard Loggins, Iain Bason, Sam Bogoch, Joost Romeu, Jeff Williams, Mike Smith.

MacTech Quarterly – Spring 1989

Volume 1, Number 1:
This issue of MacTech Quarterly was produced with Microsoft’s Word 3.01, Aldus’ PageMaker 3.0, FreeHand, Adobe Illustrator 88, and Silicon Beach Software’s SuperPaint on a Macintosh Plus, SE and II. Some images were scanned using Apple’s Scanner. Proofs were done on the Apple LaserWriter Plus. Final output was generated on a Linotronic 300.

MacTech Quarterly – Summer 1989

Volume 1, Number 2:

Production Notes:

This issue of MacTech Quarterly was produced with Microsoft’s Word 3.01, Aldus’ PageMaker 3.0, FreeHand, Adobe Illustrator 88, and Silicon Beach Software’s SuperPaint on a Macintosh Plus, SE and II. Some images were scanned using Apple’s Scanner. Proofs were done on the Apple LaserWriter Plus. Final output was generated on a Linotronic 300.

More coming soon!

MacTech Quarterly – Autumn 1989

Volume 1, Number 3:

This issue of MacTech Quarterly was produced with Micro- soft’s Word 3.01 and 4.0, Aldus’ PageMaker 3.0, FreeHand, Adobe Illustrator 88, Desk Draw, Apple’s MacDraw II, Silicon Beach Software’s SuperPaint, and Electronic Arts’ Studio/8 on a Macintosh Plus, SE and II. Proofs were done on the Apple LaserWriter Plus, final output generated on a Linotronic 300 by Common Sense Publishing, Seattle and Sir Speedy Printing, Renton. Offset printing by Carlos & Sons Printing, Kent, Washington.

Coming Soon!

MacTech Quarterly – Spring 1990

Volume 2, Number 1:

This issue of MacTech Quarterly was produced with Microsoft’s Word 3.01 and 4.0, PowerPoint, Aldus PageMaker, Aldus FreeHand, Apple’s Mac- Draw II, and Silicon Beach Software’s SuperPaint, on a SE, SE/30 and II. Proofs were done on an Apple LaserWriter Plus and IINT, final output generated on a Linotronic 300 by Seattle ImageSetting, Seattle, and Sir Speedy Printing, Renton. Offsetprinting onto archival, acid-free paper stock by Carlos & Sons Printing, Kent, Washington.

Coming Soon!

MacTech Quarterly – Winter 1990

Volume 2, Number 2:

This issue is marked as Volume 1 Number 4 by mistake in the final printing of the issue of the magazine. This mistake was due to the haste with which it was printed and the fact that only 10 staff remained in office at the time of printing.

Coming Soon!

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